From the Wunlang Field Manager

Yel Maduok Ngor

Yel Maduok Ngor

Can you introduce yourself to me? Yel: My full name is Yel Maduok Ngor. I am from Wunlang. I was born at the beginning of civil war in south Sudan. My father and mother never had been to school because there was no school in Wunlang when they were at school age.   What do you have in education? Yel: I a have high school diploma from Uganda   You just said your parents do not have any education, how did you go to school? Yel: During the civil war my father lost his cows. As you know cows are everything to Dinka tribe. My father started new life as a farmer and then changed to small business. My father decided to send me to school because there were no cows. When I finished 8th grade in Wunlang School, my father decided to send me to Uganda to finish my high school. I was the only one from Wunalng School to finish my high school. War changes everything, {now} everyone is eager to his children to school.   When did you finish high school? Yel: in 2006.   When did you start working as a Field Manager to Wunlang School Project? Yel: in March 2007   What is the progress of the building plan? Yel: Since March 2007, Wunlang community has been busy making bricks as the first step for construction of the school. We are so happy to get fund from US to hire people to make brick. We were able to hire 15 people and this is the first time in our story in Wunlang to create jobs for our people. We divided people in three groups (5 people in each group). We paid them 30,000.00 Sudanese dinnar for 1000 bricks. People stopped making bricks because of the rainy season. We made 163,000 bricks. We burnt {fired} all of them and they are now in good condition. We are waiting for you in US to send us money to start the construction when the rainy season is over by the end of October. I also contacted the builder Mr. Francis; he is not in our area now. I spoke with him last time and he told me that he has three teams of builders.   How is bore hole doing? Yel: It is doing well, it broke down one time but we fixed it and is in good condition now. The problem we have with bore hole is that more six villages are using it. One bore hole is not enough to six villages in addition to students. It is a big problem. In summer, cows and goats drink from it. But it is much better than last year. At least we have clean water. Student used to cut their classes to look for water. It is not a case now.   How is the school under trees? Yel: There are 350 students right now. Some students will show up late because this time of the year food is a big problem and many children are discouraged by that. Classes run well when there is no rain for all day, but when it rains school is closed. There are no houses near school to accommodate 350 people when it rains. The best thing to do is to ask children when it rains to run to their houses. Of course some children who walk long distance get wet on way home. There are 12 teachers in Wunlang School. Some of them walk long distance, some bike and some live close by. There are no school supplies, no shoes and no school uniforms.   Do women in Wunlang want to learn to read and write? Yel: Yes, women want to read and write. This is one of the biggest issues we have in south Sudan. I am glad you asked me about that. No one thinks about them. As you know there is gap in gender education. Women are behind and they need a lot of help with education. A lot of returnees will find Wunlang a good place to settle if we have adult education for women.   Anything you need to add? Yel: We are so glad from the people who help from US. We will not forget your support of building Wunlang School. We hope to see you in Wunlang.